2012-11-21

Mystery cells, case #13

CellaVision News Blast continues to provide you with unusual cell morphology cases.

This Mystery cells case presents a 7 day old baby girl, at Sharp Memorial Hospital in San Diego USA. Upon examination at birth by a Pathologist the placenta was found to have bacteria and inflammation. The hospital examines all placenta’s and Umbilical Cords on each birth.

The patient details are as follows:

  • 7 day old girl
  • WBC  21.0 x 10^9/l
  • RBC unremarkable
  • Hb unremarkable
  • HCT unremarkable
  • PLT unremarkable
  • NRBC’s 3%

A FBC was performed and the results are as follows: Left Shift seen on Differential. Differential count was performed using the CellaVision DM96.

The cells looked like this:
 

 
  
Do you know what this is?

Please post your suggestion!

13 thoughts on “Mystery cells, case #13”

  1. The WBC count for this age is approximately normal to slightly elevated, toxic granulation can be seen on neutrophilic and monocytic lineage as well as vacoellation process, that can reflect the active bacterial infection, slightly hypersigmentation can be seen on nuetrophilic and eosynophilic lineage as well as kariorexy that reflects the megaloblastic process that can be observed in this age due to mothers dietary habits. But the most characteristic process that I saw is the small vilus like projections on lymphocytic lineage along with nucleoli can be seen on some of them. but I think if this is a HCL process it should be seen by a pancytopenic process ???
    But regarding all of this I think it is a process of HCL or HCL Variant or HCL Japeni’s Variant, and for differentiation between them it should be prepare the TRAP, CD103, CD25 and Annexin A1 results.

  2. I suggest: leukocytes in the normal range for age, presence of eosinophils, monocytes, neutrophils (myelocytes, bands, segmented), atypical lymphocytes.
    These cells are present in normal blood of newborns.

Comment on this blogpost

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Subscribe

Do you have an interesting story to share?